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The Daily Enlightenment

 

 Internal Medicine                                      

 

                                                                      Theory                                             ***

  • Yin and Yang
    Introduction to Yin and Yang which discusses the four main aspects of Yin Yang, as well as the history and it's role in Chinese medicine and pathology.
  • Jing, Qi, Blood, and Jin Ye
    Some fundamental ideas about the Vital Substances in Chinese Medicine.
  • The Internal Organs (Zang Fu)
    Some functions and properties of each of the Zang (Yin) and Fu (Yang) organs in TCM. This area also includes some of the major organ relationships.
  • The 6 Extraordinary Organs
    A brief discussion on the Marrow, Brain, Bone, Uterus, Vessels, and the Gallbladder.
  • The Causes of Illness
    The six evils are covered in this section (Wind, Cold, Damp, Heat, Summer Heat, and Dryness), as well as the seven emotions (Anger, Fear, Fright, Grief, Joy, Worry and Pensiveness), and other major causes of illness.
  • Origins of TCM
    Ideas about the origins of Traditional Chinese Medicine theory and philosophy, as well as theories on how acupuncture points were discovered.
  • Shen (Spirit)
    Translated sometimes as "spirit" or "mind" but still difficult to translate. Shen implies consciousness, mental function, mental health, vitality, or "presence".
  • The Five Elements (Cycles) (Cosmic Hinge) *
    Very basic Five Element theory, with a diagram to help explain the different cycles
    , and a table to illustrate the associations for the elements.
 

 

 

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Disclaimer:

The Material presented on this Website is for information purposes only and is not designed to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. It is not recommended that laypersons practice Chinese Medicine without the guidance of a licensed professional. No responsibility is accepted by the author or publishers or anyone associated with the production of the Website for any errors or any damage or injury, healthwise or otherwise, suffered by any person acting upon or relying on the information contained in the Website.

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